Portsmouth

What actually are societies at university?

What’s a university society?

Why join one?

I’m not really interested in anything, what would I do?

University is all about being more independent and trying new things. For most people the thought of going can be both an exciting and scary thought. Which is where societies come in.  They help you settle in and get to know other students who are in the exactly the same position as you.

So, what are they? Societies are just groups of students who all share a common interest. This can be music, sports, languages… you name it – we have it! But if not, then you can create your own society!

Joining a society is so much more than just a hobby – there’s a sense of community – you make some amazing friends whilst doing something you love each week.

 

Still not convinced?  Here are my top 4 reasons why joining a society should be top of your list when you come to uni.  So why should I join a society at university?

1. It keeps you busy 

A busy student is a happy student. If you are living away from home for the first time you may sometimes feel lonely. Joining a society helps you make great friends and keeps you active.

2. You experience new things

I’m part of Taekwondo Society. In my first year I got to go to my first ever Taekwondo competition where I competed against other universities. I would never have had that opportunity if I wasn’t a member.

I’m also in Music Society. We get the opportunity to play in concerts and gigs throughout the year and there is even a music tour in June. If it weren’t for the society I would never have had the opportunity to perform abroad with my instrument.

3. Relax

You can relax and leave any worries and stresses in the lecture theatres.

4. Dedication

University is about making more of your opportunities. If you have been swimming all your life and you really enjoy it, then going to university shouldn’t hold you back. Joining a relevant society means you can keep doing the things you love regularly, despite a change in location.

I’m in! But how would I get involved?

It’s really easy, you go along to fresher’s fayre talk to current members and sign up to any that you like the sound of. You can join as many as you want – I have friends who are part of no societies whilst others, like myself, are members of 4 or more! 

Still not for you?

If you don’t like the look of any societies available at your university, that’s okay! Why don’t you give one a go anyway? University is all about learning new things and pushing yourself in directions you normally wouldn’t go in. Give it a whirl, you might surprise yourself.

Are you doing too much revision?

Struggling to memorise your notes despite constant re-reading?

Do you spend a lot of time making revision notes?

Spend lots of time thinking about all the revision you need to do instead of actually revising?

If you said yes to any of these….you’re not alone! Almost every student (no matter how old!) can struggle with revising efficiently.

If this sounds like you, don’t worry – trial and error is needed because everyone works differently.

I’m Josiane and I’m a second year Psychology student. Like any other student, I have been faced with tests and exams all my life. But it is only now that I am starting to get the hang of how to revise in a way that works best for me.

I have put together a list of 7 ways to revise better using my years of exam experience. This works wonders on anyone and everyone!

7 ways to revise better:
  1. Start early This means that you can spread your learning out (and avoids panicked cramming the night before)
  2. Space out your learning  Memorising information takes time
  3. Don’t cram! Actors don’t leave their rehearsals until the day before the performance…so why should you leave all your work to do the night before an exam? You may struggle to learn new information in such a short space of time
  4. Keep testing yourself  Don’t be embarrassed to use your friends and family. Get them to ask you questions about what you are learning
  5. Look after yourself Sleep and eat well to have a healthy brain
  6. Teach someone else This helps your memory –  you will need to know what you are talking about back to front in order to teach someone else
  7. Sleep! This helps you to remember the revision you have learned. If you get a bad night’s sleep then your brain won’t be working at it’s best…It’ll be harder to recall information you need

 

But most importantly:

keep calm and stay positive – you can do it!

If you want to learn more about revising efficiently then check out this link: https://forwardthinking.ppls.ed.ac.uk/2017/12/02/revision-tips-psychology/

Not so secret life of a uni student

As it reaches May, it’s almost the end of the academic year for most of our students.

We decided it would be the perfect time to take a look back at the past year for one of our Student Ambassadors, Richard.

Richard is a final year BSc(Hons) Geography student, some of you will remember him, from his @NextStepUoP Instagram takeover.  Here he is, just after he finished his dissertation!

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Richard started this year by going off on a fieldtrip to America! The trip was lots of fun, but the most important part of the trip was to make it to the summit of Mount Washington, to potentially record some of the fastest wind speeds on Earth.

Here is the first stop of the trip, Boston!

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Richard clearly had an early start on the summit day of his climb of Mount Washington…look at that sunrise!  Here is a view of the Appalachian Mountains at dawn that Richard took before he had to jump in a jeep to ascend the mountain!

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This is a view above the clouds, facing the Atlantic Ocean. Doesn’t it look amazing? Richard and his coursemates had the opportunity to record their own data whilst up here.

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On the way back home, Richard had time to stop off at New York City after a long nine hour journey by coach. Here’s a picture of the World Trade Centre in the evening…doesn’t it look incredible?

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After the field-trip and some deadlines, it was time to go home for Christmas. After a long time away at uni, it’s always a great feeling to relax at home with your family…especially the pets! Check out Richard’s cat chilling out in all the presents!

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In January, after coming back to uni, Richard went to visit London with his girlfriend for their anniversary. One of the opportunities at university is the chance to go and check out new places, and at Portsmouth it’s very close to places like London and has great travel links via train.

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During dissertation month, it’s also important to remember to take a break! Richard and some friends decided to escape the University Library and head down to Southsea beach for some fresh air. Being outside really helps to clear your head after so much studying, and look at that sunset!

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Here is the Brighton Dome…Portsmouth is about an hour away by train to Brighton, so it’s very easy to go and visit for the day. Both cities are seaside cities, but are very different places.

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Last of all, to celebrate finishing his dissertation Richard went rock-climbing in the Fontainebleau Forest, France. A uni there are loads of opportunities to carry on with any hobbies you enjoyed before, and to try out some new ones.

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That’s all for now…there are still one more month of uni left for Richard, so let’s wish him luck with the last of his studies!